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Men's Shoes and Knee Joint Torques Relevant to the Development and Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis

D. CASEY KERRIGAN, MARK E. KARVOSKY, JENNIFER L. LELAS, and PATRICK O. RILEY

ABSTRACT.

Objective.
To determine if men's dress shoes and sneakers increase knee joint torques and play the same role in the development and/or progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) as women's high-heeled dress shoes.

Methods. Three-dimensional data regarding lower extremity torques and motion were collected during walking in 22 healthy men while (1) wearing dress shoes, (2) wearing sneakers, and (3) barefoot. Data were plotted and qualitatively compared; major peak values were statistically compared between conditions.

Results. The external knee varus torque in early stance was slightly greater with the dress shoes and sneakers, but this slight increase can be explained by the faster walking speed with shoes. No significant increases were found in any other of the sagittal, coronal, or transverse knee torques when walking with dress shoes and sneakers compared to barefoot.

Conclusion. Men's dress shoes and sneakers do not significantly affect knee joint torques that may have relevance to the development and/or progression of knee OA. (J Rheumatol 2003;30:529-33)

Key Indexing Terms:

GAIT
BIOMECHANICS
KINETICS
KINEMATICS
HUMAN
SHOES


From the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School and the Center for Rehabilitation Science, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Supported by the Ellison Foundation.

D.C. Kerrigan, MD, MS; P.O. Riley, PhD, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School and the Center for Rehabilitation Science, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital; M.E. Karvosky, MA; J.L. Lelas, MS, Center for Rehabilitation Science, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

Address reprint requests to Dr. D.C. Kerrigan, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Virginia, 545 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 240, Charlottesville, VA 22908-1004, USA. E-mail: dck7b@virginia.edu

Submitted February 26, 2002; revision accepted July 4, 2002.




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